Home >> Linux >> California May Restore Broadband Privacy Rules Killed By Congress and Trump

California May Restore Broadband Privacy Rules Killed By Congress and Trump

An anonymous reader quotes a report from Ars Technica: A proposed law in California would require Internet service providers to obtain customers’ permission before they use, share, or sell the customers’ Web browsing history. The California Broadband Internet Privacy Act, a bill introduced by Assembly member Ed Chau (D-Monterey Park) on Monday, is very similar to an Obama-era privacy rule that was scheduled to take effect across the US until President Trump and the Republican-controlled Congress eliminated it. If Chau’s bill becomes law, ISPs in California would have to get subscribers’ opt-in consent before using browsing history and other sensitive information in order to serve personalized advertisements. Consumers would have the right to revoke their consent at any time. The opt-in requirement in Chau’s bill would apply to “Web browsing history, application usage history, content of communications, and origin and destination Internet Protocol (IP) addresses of all traffic.” The requirement would also apply to geolocation data, IP addresses, financial and health information, information pertaining to minors, names and billing information, Social Security numbers, demographic information, and personal details such as physical addresses, e-mail addresses, and phone numbers.


Share on Google+

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

*