Home >> Linux >> Chrome 63 Offers Even More Protection From Malicious Sites, Using Even More Memory

Chrome 63 Offers Even More Protection From Malicious Sites, Using Even More Memory

An anonymous reader quotes a report from Ars Technica: To further increase its enterprise appeal, Chrome 63 — which hit the browser’s stable release channel yesterday — includes a couple of new security enhancements aimed particularly at the corporate market. The first of these is site isolation, an even stricter version of the multiple process model that Chrome has used since its introduction. Chrome uses multiple processes for several security and stability reasons. On the stability front, the model means that even if a single tab crashes, other tabs (and the browser itself) are unaffected. On the security front, the use of multiple processes makes it much harder for malicious code from one site to steal secrets (such as passwords typed into forms) of another. […]

Naturally, this greater use of multiple processes incurs a price; with this option enabled, Chrome’s already high memory usage can go up by another 15 to 20 percent. As such, it’s not enabled by default; instead, it’s intended for use by enterprise users that are particularly concerned about organizational security. The other new capability is the ability for administrators to block extensions depending on the features those extensions need to use. For example, an admin can block any extension that tries to use file system access, that reads or writes the clipboard, or that accesses the webcam or microphone. Additionally, Google has started to deploy TLS 1.3, the latest version of Transport Layer Security, the protocol that enables secure communication between a browser and a Web server. In Chrome 63, this is only enabled between Chrome and Gmail; in 2018, it’ll be turned on more widely.


Share on Google+

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

*