Home >> Linux >> Comcast ‘Blocks’ an Encrypted Email Service: Yet Another Reminder Why Net Neutrality Matters

Comcast ‘Blocks’ an Encrypted Email Service: Yet Another Reminder Why Net Neutrality Matters

Zack Whittaker, writing for ZDNet: For about twelve hours earlier this month, encrypted email service Tutanota seemed to fall off the face of the internet for Comcast customers. Starting in the afternoon on March 1, people weren’t sure if the site was offline or if it had been attacked. Reddit threads speculated about the outage. Some said that Comcast was actively blocking the site, while others dismissed the claims altogether. Several tweets alerted the Hanover, Germany-based encrypted messaging provider to the alleged blockade, which showed a “connection timed out” message to Comcast users. It was as if to hundreds of Comcast customers, Tutanota didn’t exist. But as soon as users switched to another non-Comcast internet connection, the site appeared as normal. “To us, this came as a total surprise,” said Matthias Pfau, co-founder of Tutanota, in an email. “It was quite a shock as such an outage shows the immense power [internet providers] are having over our Internet when they can block sites…without having to justify their action in any way,” he said. By March 2, the site was back, but the encrypted email provider was none the wiser to the apparent blockade. The company contacted Comcast for answers, but did not receive a reply. When contacted, a Comcast spokesperson couldn’t say why the site was blocked — or even if the internet and cable giant was behind it. According to a spokesperson, engineers investigated the apparent outage but found there was no evidence of a connection breakage between Comcast and Tutanota. The company keeps records of issues that trigger incidents — but found nothing to suggest an issue. It’s not the first time Comcast customers have been blocked from accessing popular sites. Last year, the company purposefully blocked access to internet behemoth Archive.org for more than 13 hours.


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