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Java’s Open Sourcing Still Controversial Ten Years Later

An anonymous reader quotes InfoWorld:
Sun Microsystems officially open-sourced Java on November 13, 2006… “The source code for Java was available to all from the first day it was released in 1995,” says [Java creator James] Gosling, who is now chief architect at Liquid Robotics. “What we wanted out of that was for the community to help with security analysis, bug reporting, performance enhancement, understanding corner cases, and a whole lot more. It was very successful.” Java’s original license, Gosling says, allowed people to use the source code internally but not redistribute. “It wasn’t ‘open’ enough for the ‘open source’ crowd,” he says… While Gosling has taken Oracle to task for its handling of Java at times, he sees the [2006] open-sourcing as beneficial. “It’s one of the most heavily scrutinized and solid bodies of software you’ll find. Community participation was vitally important…”
A former Oracle Java evangelist, however, sees the open source move as watered down. “Sun didn’t open-source Java per se,” says Reza Rahman, who has led a recent protest against Oracle’s handling of enterprise Java. “What they did was to open-source the JDK under a modified GPL license. In particular, the Java SE and Java EE TCKs [Technology Compatibility Kits] remain closed source.”
Rahman adds that “Without open-sourcing the JDK, I don’t think Java would be where it is today.”


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