Home >> Linux >> Students Are Failing AP Tests Because the College Boards Can’t Handle HEIC Images

Students Are Failing AP Tests Because the College Boards Can’t Handle HEIC Images

Many high school students around the country completed Advanced Placement tests online last week but were unable to submit them at the end because the testing portal doesn’t support HEIC images — the default format on iOS devices and some newer Android phones. The Verge reports: For the uninitiated: AP exams require longform answers. Students can either type their response or upload a photo of handwritten work. Students who choose the latter option can do so as a JPG, JPEG, or PNG format according to the College Board’s coronavirus FAQ. But the testing portal doesn’t support the default format on iOS devices and some newer Android phones, HEIC files. HEIC files are smaller than JPEGs and other formats, thus allowing you to store a lot more photos on an iPhone. Basically, only Apple (and, more recently, Samsung) use the HEIC format — most other websites and platforms don’t support it. Even popular Silicon Valley-based services, such as Slack, don’t treat HEICs the same way as standard JPEGs.

[Nick Bryner, a high school senior in Los Angeles] says many of his classmates also tried to submit iPhone photos and experienced the same problem. The issue was so common that his school’s AP program forwarded an email from the College Board to students on Sunday including tidbits of advice to prevent submission errors. “What’s devastating is that thousands of students now have an additional three weeks of stressful studying for retakes,” Bryner said. The email Bryner received doesn’t mention the HEIC format, though it does link to the College Board’s website, which instructs students with iPhones to change their camera settings so that photos save as JPEGs rather than HEICs. The company also linked to that information in a tweet early last week. In a statement emailed to The Verge, the College Board said that “the vast majority of students successfully completed their exams” in the first few days of online testing, “with less than 1 percent unable to submit their responses.” The company also noted that “We share the deep disappointment of students who were unable to submit responses.”


Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

*