Home >> Linux >> What Happens to Open Source Code After Its Developer Dies?

What Happens to Open Source Code After Its Developer Dies?

An anonymous reader writes:
The late Jim Weirich “was a seminal member of the western world’s Ruby community,” according to Ruby developer Justin Searls, who at the age of 30 took over Weirich’s tools (which are used by huge sites like Hulu, Kickstarter, and Twitter). Soon Searls made a will and a succession plan for his own open-source projects. Wired calls succession “a growing concern in the open-source software community,” noting developers have another option: transferring their copyrights to an open source group (for example, the Apache Foundation).
Most package-management systems have “at least an ad-hoc process for transferring control over a library,” according to Wired, but they also note that “that usually depends on someone noticing that a project has been orphaned and then volunteering to adopt it.” Evan Phoenix of the Ruby Gems project acknowledges that “We don’t have an official policy mostly because it hasn’t come up all that often. We do have an adviser council that is used to decide these types of things case by case.” Searls suggests GitHub and package managers like Ruby Gems add a “dead man’s switch” to their platform, which would allow programmers to automatically transfer ownership of a project or an account to someone else if the creator doesn’t log in or make changes after a set period of time.

Wired also spoke to Michael Droettboom, who took over the Python library Matplotlib after John Hunter died in 2012. He points out that “Sometimes there are parts of the code that only one person understands,” stressing the need for developers to also understand the code they’re inheriting.


Share on Google+

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

*